Blog

Dave Baker | November 22, 2017

Build vs. Buy… Or the Best of Both?

As a test engineering manager, making the decision to build your next test system using in-house resources or by working with external contractors can be a difficult one. This single decision will influence most of your future decisions regarding your test system, and can ultimately govern the success or failure of a test team.  

Ralph Hutson | October 26, 2017

Accelerate Your Functional Test With These 5 Strategies

In general, most manufacturers focus on improving throughput while cutting test costs. But, there is usually a common misconception that the process to improve throughput is costly and time consuming. Manufacturers typically assume that to improve throughput, they need to completely overhaul their existing functional test system design and processes. But this does not have to be the case. Here are five simple ways to improve the efficiency of your existing functional test system design with minimal time and costs:

Dave Baker | September 07, 2017

Designing Flexible Functional Test Systems

When it comes to testing nearly any product, the person who developed the functional test system and wrote the test software code is usually not the same person performing the testing. This creates a challenge in a dynamic testing environment where the functional tests required frequently fluctuate. For these instances, a flexible functional test system is ideal, but designing one is a challenging task.

James Duvall | August 08, 2017

Five Little-Known Benefits of ATE Self-Testing

Your automated test equipment (ATE) is likely one of your organization’s most valuable assets – this is the tool that ensures your products are in safe and proper working order when they leave your facility. But, like any mechanical device, your ATE can experience issues. So, how do you prevent unexpected issues with your ATE?

James Duvall | August 08, 2017

How to Create Successful Automated Test Equipment Self-Tests

Automated self-tests are crucial for discovering otherwise unforeseeable faults in your automated test equipment (ATE). Here are the five tried-and-true best practices for creating successful ATE self-tests that will provide reliable and easy-to-use test data, while eliminating user confusion.